Maravillas interestelares

Primero la maravilla:

Y ahora la explicación:

In 1054, a supernova went off in our galactic neighborhood and was recorded in a number of historical accounts. Today, the remnants of that blast form the spectacular Crab Nebula shown above. Buried within it is a rapidly rotating neutron star, which we can detect by its pulsed emissions. Now, researchers have used a rather unusual telescope—one that incorporates our own planet into the optics—to catch a glimpse of the pulsar using very high energy gamma rays.

The results are surprising: in contrast to expectations, the pulses are visible at energies of 100GeV and beyond, casting doubt on our current models for how pulsars work.

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